The Swan Saga

As I am a Warsop-based blogger, most of my work will begin locally and expand out into the wider district as restrictions start to lift. As the ethos of this blog is to focus on community-based projects, local businesses, stories, etc. It feels appropriate to feature the Swan Saga in its very own blog post.

You cannot spell ‘Warsop Parish’ without ‘Swans’… Well actually, you can! That being said, it remains clear that the swans possess a central significance to the Warsop community. They are key characters, whether through online updates on their activities, beautiful shots shared on Facebook (albeit swan pics are a bit like marmite in some groups), or whether you just visit The Carrs daily and pass them on your walks. Warsop is fascinated by The Swans. 

Nubert, aka ‘Long-Neck’ remains a central feature on the Mill Dam.

If you are a regular Warsop social media user, you will be familiar with daily posts regarding the ‘VIS’ (Very Important Swans) and their whereabouts. Today, I was able to pop down for an hour and find out a bit more about the swans… Within minutes, it was clear just how observant and invested many locals were, with the forthcoming cygnets, and to be honest, as somebody that knows next to nothing about swans or wildlife, I found it rather interesting and educational. The fact that this is all happening right on our doorstep, provides folks with a front-seat view of a real-life, Attenborough-style nature documentary.

‘People see swans as beautiful and serene creatures, and they’re not always – there can be a nasty side to them.’

Upon explaining the behaviour and complexity of swans. Although beautiful and serene, they can be dangerous.

It was lovely to see local people chatting away, and speculating over when the next lot of cygnets will arrive. As I sat, watching the swans and candidly conversing with the swan lady (as she is widely known as here), it was interesting to see Nubert guard Gert and the eggs, as he began collating straw and shrubbery, to add to the nest.

‘The nest is built by the female, while the male supplies the materials.’ (Nesting Habits)

It was also apparent and lovely to see, that there is a shared community spirit and enthusiasm towards the new additions, which are estimated to hatch May-time.

The female lays eggs between late April and early May. Both sexes incubate the eggs, which hatch after 35-41 days.’ (Breeding Timeline)

Nubert (Long-Neck) guards Gert and the eggs.

I was provided with an informative breakdown of recent swan activity.

  • ‘Lockdown’ ignited local interest in the swans and their daily whereabouts.
  • Last year, Gert had cygnets with Bert. Bert died in July 2020. (Fuelling conspiracy theories on Facebook)
  • Gert was left to bring up 9 cygnets on her own, as 1 died. The cygnets stuck around, as at the time, there were no Cobs (male swans) present to chase them away.
  • On September 8th, Bill, a rescued Cob, was re-homed on The Carrs.
  • Bill and Penny got on fine together.
  • Nubert (Long-Neck) flew in November (2020).
  • The 2 swans that currently have taken residence on the island of The Carrs are Gert and Nubert, who are awaiting their cygnets to hatch.
  • 2 other local swans (Penny, aka Jilted Jill and Bill) were chased off upstream, this pair can be found further up the river.
Gert and Nubert on the island, guarding the eggs.

Ultimately, if you are interested in knowing more about the local swans and want to stay up to date on the cygnets, I will share a follow-up post when they have hatched. Likewise, you can join any local Warsop-based Facebook group, for daily updates and musings of Nubert, Gert, and co.

Stay safe and stay tuned.


Thank you for supporting ‘Mansfield On The Map’ – I am a student, and freelance, Mansfield-based writer and blogger. If you would like to support my work and make a voluntary contribution, then please feel free to do so, through PayPal: mansfieldonthemap@outlook.com

Facebook: @mansfieldonthemap
Instagram: @mansfieldonthemap
Twitter: @mansfieldonmap

The Swan Saga

Author: Phoebe Cox

Date Published: 10 Apr 2021

As I am a Warsop-based blogger, most of my work will begin locally and expand out into the wider district as restrictions start to lift. As the ethos of this blog is to focus on community-based projects, local businesses, stories, etc. It feels appropriate to feature the Swan Saga in its very own blog post.

You cannot spell ‘Warsop Parish’ without ‘Swans’… Well actually, you can! That being said, it remains clear that the swans possess a central significance to the Warsop community. They are key characters, whether through online updates on their activities, beautiful shots shared on Facebook (albeit swan pics are a bit like marmite in some groups), or whether you just visit The Carrs daily and pass them on your walks. Warsop is fascinated by The Swans. 

Nubert, aka ‘Long-Neck’ remains a central feature on the Mill Dam.

If you are a regular Warsop social media user, you will be familiar with daily posts regarding the ‘VIS’ (Very Important Swans) and their whereabouts. Today, I was able to pop down for an hour and find out a bit more about the swans… Within minutes, it was clear just how observant and invested many locals were, with the forthcoming cygnets, and to be honest, as somebody that knows next to nothing about swans or wildlife, I found it rather interesting and educational. The fact that this is all happening right on our doorstep, provides folks with a front-seat view of a real-life, Attenborough-style nature documentary.

‘People see swans as beautiful and serene creatures, and they’re not always – there can be a nasty side to them.’

Upon explaining the behaviour and complexity of swans. Although beautiful and serene, they can be dangerous.

It was lovely to see local people chatting away, and speculating over when the next lot of cygnets will arrive. As I sat, watching the swans and candidly conversing with the swan lady (as she is widely known as here), it was interesting to see Nubert guard Gert and the eggs, as he began collating straw and shrubbery, to add to the nest.

‘The nest is built by the female, while the male supplies the materials.’ (Nesting Habits)

It was also apparent and lovely to see, that there is a shared community spirit and enthusiasm towards the new additions, which are estimated to hatch May-time.

The female lays eggs between late April and early May. Both sexes incubate the eggs, which hatch after 35-41 days.’ (Breeding Timeline)

Nubert (Long-Neck) guards Gert and the eggs.

I was provided with an informative breakdown of recent swan activity.

  • ‘Lockdown’ ignited local interest in the swans and their daily whereabouts.
  • Last year, Gert had cygnets with Bert. Bert died in July 2020. (Fuelling conspiracy theories on Facebook)
  • Gert was left to bring up 9 cygnets on her own, as 1 died. The cygnets stuck around, as at the time, there were no Cobs (male swans) present to chase them away.
  • On September 8th, Bill, a rescued Cob, was re-homed on The Carrs.
  • Bill and Penny got on fine together.
  • Nubert (Long-Neck) flew in November (2020).
  • The 2 swans that currently have taken residence on the island of The Carrs are Gert and Nubert, who are awaiting their cygnets to hatch.
  • 2 other local swans (Penny, aka Jilted Jill and Bill) were chased off upstream, this pair can be found further up the river.
Gert and Nubert on the island, guarding the eggs.

Ultimately, if you are interested in knowing more about the local swans and want to stay up to date on the cygnets, I will share a follow-up post when they have hatched. Likewise, you can join any local Warsop-based Facebook group, for daily updates and musings of Nubert, Gert, and co.

Stay safe and stay tuned.


Thank you for supporting ‘Mansfield On The Map’ – I am a student, and freelance, Mansfield-based writer and blogger. If you would like to support my work and make a voluntary contribution, then please feel free to do so, through PayPal: mansfieldonthemap@outlook.com

Facebook: @mansfieldonthemap
Instagram: @mansfieldonthemap
Twitter: @mansfieldonmap

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