Didn’t You Hear About… Vardy

Vardy’s new EP PANDEMONIUM 555 is due out August 11th, so we arranged to meet up at The Bold Forester for a pint and a chat about Vardy’s music and what people can expect from the new EP. 

 

As somebody who has listened to the 7 track EP before its official release, it is clear that Daniel, who goes by his last name Vardy does not hold back with how he feels. With Politically Correct Cry Babies calling out politics left, right, and centre, Vardy shared that he knew this song would ruffle some feathers and I tend to agree. Some people will love it, and others will hate it as it cuts right down the middle, leaving no stone unturned. Message aside, the music is solid and certainly highlights Vardy’s musical versatility as he brings the lyrics to life with his dialect coming through in the vocals. You listen and know full well, that’s Vardy.

The boldness and unfiltered nature of his lyrics do not stop there, as other songs such as Extinction (Cull The Human Race) and A Nursery Rhyme For The Pandemic, demonstrate Vardy’s signature social commentary of what he expresses to be social hypocrisy, yearning for the nostalgia of his youth, without the current problems and pressures of society. Vardy goes on to compare the media lies to that of a pandemic, which once again enters political and social territory.

Daniel also opened up about his life-long mental health struggles and how that is very central to his work and creative process. Although the EP feels very political in part, it does not possess an identifiable political leaning, as many songs call out perceived hypocrisy across the political divide. The EP appears to have rather an anarchist theme at times, looking inwards as opposed to outwards for a solution, as Vardy channels a narrative voice that is disinterested with broken promises and political agendas. Professionally Outraged further gives voice to a growing frustration of double standards and a blatant disconnect to political discourse, as the musician, originally from Meden Vale but currently residing in Derby proclaims: ‘Yeah I’m angry!’

If you listen to the EP on August 11th, you can certainly tell that society is the root of that anger, and Vardy’s perception of the world has shaped his music explicitly so within PANDEMONIUM 555. Enough of me waffling on, let’s hear from Vardy himself…

 

 

Daniel, after our little chat about all things Mansfield and music. 

 

 

FIVE QUESTIONS WITH DANIEL JAMES VARDY

 

MOTM: Who is Vardy?

V: I’m a solo artist. I play all my own instruments, so when I go into the studio I’ll play bass, drums, guitar… The lot. Do everything myself… I’ve not been in a band for a while but I’m getting one together, at the minute I’m just looking for a bass player and then we can get practising… That’s who Vardy is.

Facebook
Instagram
PANDEMONIUM 555

So, if you’re a local bass player and interested in joining a band, get in touch with Vardy.

 

MOTM: How have the recent lockdowns impacted or influenced your music?

 

V: Well I actually quit and sold all my equipment and everything just after my son were born. And lockdown pretty much got me going again. I was thinking about releasing a track just before lockdown… December 2019 or something like that… It wa’ Get Ya Sen Fucked Off, and then after that lockdown kicked in and I just started getting all my old music together, remastering it and started learning how to make my own music videos… I just started getting really into it and it has relit my flame for music.

 

MOTM: In your own words, what can we expect from the new EP?

 

V: What you can expect from it is mixed emotions I think… It’s quite political. Some of it is quite offensive, some of it is nice. Some of it is about mental health and the way I have struggled with depression, anxiety and ADHD. It is a mixture of everything. It’s a rollercoaster up and down of madness. I’m looking forward to hearing what people think, there’s one called Politically Correct Cry Babies – which I think people will get upset about, but I’m not leaning to any side I am straight down the middle. I’m talking about everybody. I’m calling everybody cry babies.

 

MOTM: How has growing up in the Mansfield area been for you?

 

V: I’ve loved it, to be honest. I’ve always gigged in my local pubs… Three Lions, you’ve probably heard of it… Mansfield has been a massive music scene for me. There’s been loads of places I’ve played… You’ve got Town Mill, that was probably the best. It’s been brilliant. When I was in Roger The Mascot, the fanbase was in Mansfield and they were pretty big really.

 

MOTM: What are your future music plans and personal goals?

 

V: My plans are to get out there gigging, and just gig but it’s hard to get gigs at the minute. I’m struggling to get gigs, even acoustically. I’ve got one coming up on the 27th of August at The Venue supporting MuddiBrooke. It will be my first gig in 4 years, that’s how long I’ve not gigged for so I’m a bit nervous for that. My future plans – I’ve got my EP coming out, I’ve got another EP coming out after that… Then I’ve got a ten-track album that I’m going to start recording next year… In terms of recording and music, I’m busy. I’ve got five new music videos planned with a guy called Jack Clayton, one of my mates… So I’ve got the right people behind me. That’s my plans really… I’ll definitely be busy for the next two years music-wise.

 

Roger The Mascot released this version of BadBoi in 2014, and with the Euros in full swing, it feels like a good time to bring it back!

Vardy was funny, honest, and very passionate about the music, he is always humbled by the online response he receives from others who resonate with his lyrics. He was ever so the gentleman as he bought me two drinks and wished me the best of luck with this creative blogging endeavor. I shared with him how I wanted to feature female artists locally too, and he agreed that there are a lot of women out there who have not always had their fair share in the industry, and it is certainly time to platform them. It is safe to say that we will all be hearing a lot more about Vardy in the future, with controversial lyrics and signature vocals, the musician from Mansfield will certainly have people talking. 

 

SHOUTOUT:
So if you’re a local woman in music and you have a story to share or an EP to promote, hit me up, and let’s get you on the map.

Didn’t You Hear About… Vardy

Author: Phoebe Cox

Date Published: 06 Jul 2021

Vardy’s new EP PANDEMONIUM 555 is due out August 11th, so we arranged to meet up at The Bold Forester for a pint and a chat about Vardy’s music and what people can expect from the new EP. 

 

As somebody who has listened to the 7 track EP before its official release, it is clear that Daniel, who goes by his last name Vardy does not hold back with how he feels. With Politically Correct Cry Babies calling out politics left, right, and centre, Vardy shared that he knew this song would ruffle some feathers and I tend to agree. Some people will love it, and others will hate it as it cuts right down the middle, leaving no stone unturned. Message aside, the music is solid and certainly highlights Vardy’s musical versatility as he brings the lyrics to life with his dialect coming through in the vocals. You listen and know full well, that’s Vardy.

The boldness and unfiltered nature of his lyrics do not stop there, as other songs such as Extinction (Cull The Human Race) and A Nursery Rhyme For The Pandemic, demonstrate Vardy’s signature social commentary of what he expresses to be social hypocrisy, yearning for the nostalgia of his youth, without the current problems and pressures of society. Vardy goes on to compare the media lies to that of a pandemic, which once again enters political and social territory.

Daniel also opened up about his life-long mental health struggles and how that is very central to his work and creative process. Although the EP feels very political in part, it does not possess an identifiable political leaning, as many songs call out perceived hypocrisy across the political divide. The EP appears to have rather an anarchist theme at times, looking inwards as opposed to outwards for a solution, as Vardy channels a narrative voice that is disinterested with broken promises and political agendas. Professionally Outraged further gives voice to a growing frustration of double standards and a blatant disconnect to political discourse, as the musician, originally from Meden Vale but currently residing in Derby proclaims: ‘Yeah I’m angry!’

If you listen to the EP on August 11th, you can certainly tell that society is the root of that anger, and Vardy’s perception of the world has shaped his music explicitly so within PANDEMONIUM 555. Enough of me waffling on, let’s hear from Vardy himself…

 

 

Daniel, after our little chat about all things Mansfield and music. 

 

 

FIVE QUESTIONS WITH DANIEL JAMES VARDY

 

MOTM: Who is Vardy?

V: I’m a solo artist. I play all my own instruments, so when I go into the studio I’ll play bass, drums, guitar… The lot. Do everything myself… I’ve not been in a band for a while but I’m getting one together, at the minute I’m just looking for a bass player and then we can get practising… That’s who Vardy is.

Facebook
Instagram
PANDEMONIUM 555

So, if you’re a local bass player and interested in joining a band, get in touch with Vardy.

 

MOTM: How have the recent lockdowns impacted or influenced your music?

 

V: Well I actually quit and sold all my equipment and everything just after my son were born. And lockdown pretty much got me going again. I was thinking about releasing a track just before lockdown… December 2019 or something like that… It wa’ Get Ya Sen Fucked Off, and then after that lockdown kicked in and I just started getting all my old music together, remastering it and started learning how to make my own music videos… I just started getting really into it and it has relit my flame for music.

 

MOTM: In your own words, what can we expect from the new EP?

 

V: What you can expect from it is mixed emotions I think… It’s quite political. Some of it is quite offensive, some of it is nice. Some of it is about mental health and the way I have struggled with depression, anxiety and ADHD. It is a mixture of everything. It’s a rollercoaster up and down of madness. I’m looking forward to hearing what people think, there’s one called Politically Correct Cry Babies – which I think people will get upset about, but I’m not leaning to any side I am straight down the middle. I’m talking about everybody. I’m calling everybody cry babies.

 

MOTM: How has growing up in the Mansfield area been for you?

 

V: I’ve loved it, to be honest. I’ve always gigged in my local pubs… Three Lions, you’ve probably heard of it… Mansfield has been a massive music scene for me. There’s been loads of places I’ve played… You’ve got Town Mill, that was probably the best. It’s been brilliant. When I was in Roger The Mascot, the fanbase was in Mansfield and they were pretty big really.

 

MOTM: What are your future music plans and personal goals?

 

V: My plans are to get out there gigging, and just gig but it’s hard to get gigs at the minute. I’m struggling to get gigs, even acoustically. I’ve got one coming up on the 27th of August at The Venue supporting MuddiBrooke. It will be my first gig in 4 years, that’s how long I’ve not gigged for so I’m a bit nervous for that. My future plans – I’ve got my EP coming out, I’ve got another EP coming out after that… Then I’ve got a ten-track album that I’m going to start recording next year… In terms of recording and music, I’m busy. I’ve got five new music videos planned with a guy called Jack Clayton, one of my mates… So I’ve got the right people behind me. That’s my plans really… I’ll definitely be busy for the next two years music-wise.

 

Roger The Mascot released this version of BadBoi in 2014, and with the Euros in full swing, it feels like a good time to bring it back!

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Vardy was funny, honest, and very passionate about the music, he is always humbled by the online response he receives from others who resonate with his lyrics. He was ever so the gentleman as he bought me two drinks and wished me the best of luck with this creative blogging endeavor. I shared with him how I wanted to feature female artists locally too, and he agreed that there are a lot of women out there who have not always had their fair share in the industry, and it is certainly time to platform them. It is safe to say that we will all be hearing a lot more about Vardy in the future, with controversial lyrics and signature vocals, the musician from Mansfield will certainly have people talking. 

 

SHOUTOUT:
So if you’re a local woman in music and you have a story to share or an EP to promote, hit me up, and let’s get you on the map.